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15 November 2011

Hedge laying courses in Dartmoor National Park

Hedge laying courseLearn to lay hedges using traditional methods and tools on a Dartmoor National Park Authority course to be held at Parke, Bovey Tracey, during January 2012.

Dartmoor National Park Authority regularly offers annual courses in rural skills including dry stone walling and hedge laying, with experienced Master Craftsmen providing the technical training. The two-day hedge laying course will be held on 17/18 January 2012. The fee for the course is £120, and a non-refundable deposit of £40 is required to secure a place. Early booking is advisable.

Sue Halse, Conservation Officer, Dartmoor National Park Authority, said:

‘Maintaining Dartmoor’s hedgerows is important not just for the habitat they provide for a wide range of wildlife and the security for Dartmoor livestock, but also for their visual importance in the rural landscape. Traditional methods of laying, or ‘steeping’ hedges helps to preserve them and encourage new growth to form a resilient and practical stock-proof barrier that is also a home for many species of plants and animals. Species rich hedgerows are the most valuable to wildlife and are used by rare species such as cirl bunting and the greater horseshoe bat, as well as declining species such as the brown hairstreak butterfly, dormouse and song thrush.’Hedge laying course

No previous experience of hedge laying is necessary, but applicants should be aware that it is a physically demanding activity requiring a reasonable level of fitness and mobility. Tools are provided on loan for participants.   

More details can be obtained from Sue Halse, Conservation Officer, Dartmoor National Park Authority, Parke, Bovey Tracey, TQ13 9JQ.

Ends

For further information

Sue Halse, Conservation Officer

Mike Nendick, Communications Officer, Dartmoor National Park Authority

Tel: (01626) 832093

Notes for Editors

Over 600 flowering plants, 1,500 insects, 65 birds and 20 mammals have been recorded as living or feeding in hedgerows. Primrose, early purple orchid and bluebell are amongst the most characteristic plants of hedge banks.

Dartmoor National Park Authority’s purposes under the Environment Act 1995 are:

  • to conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the National Park;
  • to promote opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of the area by the public.

In carrying out this work, we are also required to seek to foster the economic and social well-being of local communities within the National Park.

Agendas for full Dartmoor National Park Authority meetings and Dartmoor National Park Authority planning meetings are available on the Authority's web site.

In carrying out this work, we are also required to seek to foster the economic and social well-being of local communities within the National Park.

Agendas for full Dartmoor National Park Authority meetings and Dartmoor National Park Authority planning meetings are available on the Authority's web site.

You can receive an e-mail notification each time a News Release is issued by the Dartmoor National Park Authority. Subscribe to Dartmoor National park Authority News.

For News Releases from all UK National Parks visit www.nationalparks.gov.uk (external link, opens new window)

For maps, guide books, trail guides, clothing and other Dartmoor merchandise visit Dartmoor National Park Authority’s Online Shop

There are 15 members of the National Parks family in the UK: Brecon Beacons, Dartmoor, Exmoor, Lake District, New Forest, Northumberland, North York Moors, Peak District, Pembrokeshire Coast, Snowdonia, South Downs, Yorkshire Dales, Loch Lomond & The Trossachs, the Cairngorms and the Broads.  National Parks are of special value to the whole nation because of their great beauty, their wildlife and cultural interests and the opportunities they offer for quiet enjoyment.  However, they are not nationally owned - the land is in the hands of many landowners or occupiers including farmers.  Over 34,500 people live in Dartmoor National Park and many millions of visits are made to it each year.

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Page last updated: 15 Nov 2011